Types of Custody Arrangements for Separated Parents

· November 27, 2018
When parents decide to separate, both parties become concerned about how much time they'll spend with their children. This issue can raise many doubts, which is why we want to go over the different types of custody arrangements for separated parents. 

In the following article, we’ll go over the different types of custody arrangements for separated parents.

However, it’s essential for parents to feel comfortable with the details. This includes understanding the different types of custody arrangements for separated parents, what defines them, and what determines them.

Below, we’ll tell you all you need to know.

What are the different types of custody arrangements for separated parents?

1. Sole custody

The first type of custody arrangement that exists among separated parents is sole custody. In this case, what happens is that only one parent has the right to live with and be responsible for the children. Exclusive custody is very uncommon.

In fact, this sort of custody arrangement usually occurs only when one of the parents is unable to take responsibility for his or her children. It’s also the case when the parent has presented inappropriate conduct.

However, this same parent often has visitation rights. If a judge considers there may be some risk to the child, these visits may require supervision.

Types of Custody Arrangements for Separated Parents

“In order for parental separations to have as little transcendence as possible, custody agreements establish the time that children spend with each parent.”

2. Joint custody

In the second place, shared custody refers to both physical and legal custody. In order for parents to obtain shared custody, they must both agree that they want to share the time they’ll spend with their child.

Several factors must exist in order for the type of custody arrangement to be viable. For example, the parents must live relatively close to one another and be available to take care of their children.

At the same time, in cases of joint custody, parents have equal rights in regards to their children. That means that both parties have equal say when it comes to decisions having to do with education, child-raising, etc.

At the same time, they share responsibilities equally and spend equal amounts of time with their children. 

The law doesn’t have precise guidelines as far as how parents distribute these times. They may be weekly, monthly, annual, etc. Or parents may establish specific days of the week that children will spend with each parent.

3. Distributed custody

The last type of custody arrangement for separated parents that we want to present today is distributed custody. This type of custody arrangement can occur in cases where parents have more than one child.

Here, parents can agree for one of the children to live with the mother and the other to live with the father

This type of agreement is very uncommon. However, family unity and the desire to benefit their children may drive some parents to carry out this unusual type of custody arrangement.

“In order for this separation to have as little transcendence as possible, custody agreements establish the time that children spend with each parent”

What are the determining factors in custody arrangements?

Without a doubt, the most important factor when it comes to custody agreements is the children’s best interest. To know what’s best for a child, judges take several variables into account. These variables include the following:

  • The children’s age.
  • The children’s needs.
  • The economic possibilities of each parent to be able to meet their children’s needs.
  • The relationship between the children and each parent and other family members.
  • Maintaining stability in the children’s lives.
Types of Custody Arrangements for Separated Parents

  • The physical and mental health of both parents and children.
  • The time that each parent has available to spend with the children.
  • The lifestyles of each parent: Judges will consider the impact that a parent’s lifestyle could have on the children.
  • The situation among siblings.

In conclusion, you should take into consideration that, in most cases, parents are able to come to a custody agreement without a judge’s intervention. However, if parents can’t agree, then a judge will have to determine what is best for their children.

At the same time, a family lawyer can also help parents and children make the best arrangement possible.