Is It Good to Control Your Partner’s Social Media?

· January 2, 2019
Who follows him? Who comments on his photos? What kind of photos does he like? If you don't stop thinking about your partner's social media, this article is for you.

Advances in technology have undoubtedly completely transformed the way people fall in love and stay in relationships. Have you ever wondered if it’s good to control your partner’s social media?

Applications like Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and even Tinder have helped people make friends and start relationships. However, they have also opened a window that shows us others’ tastes, interests and thoughts.

Nowadays, no one can deny that there is widespread anxiety to maintain an updated profile on social media. This is especially true among younger people. In addition, they need to know what’s happening at all times with their friends and partner.

People who are in relationships also demand explanations from their peers about the type of activity they have in their “virtual lives.” This can lead to developing a toxic relationship.

Is it good to control your partner’s social media?

The answer to this question without a doubt is no. Control within a relationship isn’t healthy. If an individual tries to coerce his partner into behaving within social networks the way he wants, he takes away freedom. It’s even a type of psychological aggression.

Additionally, social networks aren’t responsible for jealousy problems arising in a relationship. It’s clear that this type of media helps people get together easier. However, it depends exclusively on if the person willingly enters a prohibited relationship.

Is It Good to Control Your Partner's Social Media?

Discovering infidelities

Nowadays, it’s common for a person to try and “stalk” their spouse’s activity on their social media profiles. The person will do this secretly so their spouse doesn’t know.

In the first case, the person tells their partner who they can follow and to what extent they’re allowed to interact. In the second, the person doesn’t openly prohibit anything, but secretly reviews their partner’s activity to find possible infidelity.

This second type of control is usually quite disturbing. The conflict within the couple might arise from thinking the other person is cheating. Usually, this is based on unfounded insecurity. It can also come from jealousy.

The downside of this kind of control is that you can go from a casual review to an unhealthy habit. Then, it can become an obsession.

Thus, the jealousy leads someone to act erratically. They’ll look for new and more complex ways to dominate their partner. They may create false accounts, using third parties, or even trying to hack into their partner’s accounts.

“There is widespread anxiety to maintain an updated profile on social networks. This is especially true among younger people. In addition, they need to know what’s happening at all times with their friends and partner.”

Control and toxic relationships: identifying warning signs

Using social networks isn’t the trigger for infidelity. Additionally, they shouldn’t cause irrational feelings of distrust, jealousy or the need to control. 

As we explained in the introduction, using social media can reveal lots of qualities and preferences people have.

Is It Good to Control Your Partner's Social Media?

With the previous statement, what we’re pointing out is that the behaviors someone shows with social media can be revealing. It can show pathologies or erratic behaviors. This is especially true if they’re controlling their partner’s networks.

In that case, the question isn’t whether or not it’s good to control your partner’s social networks. When you notice you feel jealous, ask yourself how to raise your self-esteem. Also, how to disregard compulsive behaviors toward your partner’s social media. 

If you discover your partner is cheating, ask yourself why you’re still in an unfaithful relationship.

Our final recommendation is that you invest more time in yourself. Make the decision to have confidence in your partner.

Additionally, if you think the relationship no longer works, use good communication skills. Don’t fall into using controlling behaviors, because they hurt everyone.