3 Exercises To Help Your Baby Learn How To Walk

· March 7, 2018

Helping your baby learn how to walk, without being too demanding, can be a great way to share some extra time with them. You’ll also be able to participate more in their development while simultaneously strengthening the mother-child bond.

In order for these exercises to effectively teach your baby how to walk, it is important for them to feel comfortable. If your child doesn’t want to do any of these exercises, they shouldn’t be forced to do so.

In order to get a baby to participate in an exercise, it should be fun for them and at the same time related to the objective.

So, if your child cries every time you put them on the floor to try to teach them how to walk, look for another alternative or add an element that can capture the child’s curiosity.

One of these 3 exercises that we’re going to offer you here at YouAreMom might end up being very effective in helping your baby learn how to walk.

That’s why we encourage you to take all of the following exercises into account.

Baby steps

From their first steps, babies begin the journey of psychomotor development. They strengthen their muscles and learn how to coordinate their movements.

The first adventures that a baby goes on are what will help them master many skills.

Little by little, the child will raise his head, turn in the cradle, sit on his own, stand up, walk and later run. They will achieve this all in their own time. A mother’s effort is also important.

Every time a baby reaches a new stage, they will first have to master it in order to feel completely safe and comfortable, before being able to continue towards the next goal.

For example, in order to stand up, they first have to learn how to sit; in order to walk, they first have to learn how to stand, etc.

3 exercises that can help your baby learn how to walk.

When your pediatrician indicates that your child’s muscles and spine are prepared, and that they are physically developed enough to undertake the rigorous task, it’s time to encourage them to take their first steps.

Remember that you can actively help your children achieve their goals. Keep in mind that if the child feels safe, the whole process will be able to move a lot quicker.

It’s very important to make your child’s feet comfortable. You can dress them in comfortable sports shoes with soft soles or you can let them be barefoot. Whichever they prefer.

First exercise

Place your child in front of you. Let the baby get balanced on the floor by holding their hands.

Next, start a one, two count. While counting, use the tip of your feet to gently push each one of the child’s feet forward.

Let’s say: the number one should always coincide with the child shifting its weight to the right foot, and number two by shifting the child’s weight to the other foot.

You can continue with the exercise until the baby loses interest.

Although the baby won’t understand what your counting means or what he’s actually doing, this exercise will help them get accustomed to the movements involved in walking.

The act of walking through the house upright will also be a very interesting experience that they’ll surely like to repeat.

3 Exercises To Help Your Baby Learn How To Walk

Exercise 2

Put the baby on the floor and let them hold on to a piece of furniture. Hold their pacifier, favorite toy or any object that you know catches their attention. Place it close to the baby, but far enough so they can’t grab it by simply stretching out their arms.

Motivate your baby to reach the object. Smile and applaud them to provide even more stimulation. You’ll see that the baby will start to laugh happily.

After a few seconds, after measuring the distance between themselves and the object, the child should start to take steps to reach their goal.

If the child reaches the prize, congratulate them with sweet words. Show them your happiness and repeat the process with another object.

3 Exercises To Help Your Baby Learn How To Walk

Exercise 3

Place the baby in a playpen. Take a toy that catches their attention and place it at the other end of the playpen.

Motivate the child to reach the toy. At first the child might try to reach the toy by going around the playpen while holding onto the guardrails. However, as they start to gain more confidence, you can start to show them the shortest route to obtain their toy.

In order to do this, the child must let go of the guardrails and be unattached while they try to reach the other end of the playpen where their trophy lays.