31 Things That Only Mothers Think About

February 10, 2018

In this article, we’ll share with you 31 things that only mothers think about. When we don’t have enough information, we begin to worry and can sometimes ask ourselves the most unusual questions.

Sometimes we even call the pediatrician to ask them about everything that goes through our minds. Being a mom seems to be synonymous with being constantly concerned about our children.

From the moment we find out we’re pregnant, a number of things that only we can think about start to circulate in our minds.

The great news it that this never ends!

Being a mother doesn’t have an expiration date – we’ll always worry and think about our children.

Mother is the best doctor
In our nights of fever,
Mother is the best goldsmith,
She fixes our mistakes.
Mothers are born sculptors, molding with her hands,
Useful and healthy children for a better future.
-Eliseo Leon Pretell-

In this article we complied 31 common things that mothers think about from the moment we’re pregnant until our children get older.

During pregnancy

31 Things That Only Mothers Think About

  • I will not tell my friend about my pregnancy until I reach the third month. No one with negative energy should be around my pregnancy as they will only cause problems.
  • Is my child developing properly? The obstetrician will review the first ultrasound for up to 4 hours. The doctor must examine the fetus from head to toe. You better be patient.
  • I hope my child doesn’t look like… (name of spouse’s relative). God help me.
  • What happens if the child doesn’t cry at birth? What should I do?

During Birth

  • Did the doctor check properly? Did they count all the fingers and toes? Is my child complete?
  • Is everything okay? Did you talk to the doctor? Are you hiding anything from me?
  • Is the child breathing properly? Can I take him home now?
  • Can I really leave this place with my baby without anyone asking me anything? What if I am stealing it?

When taking the baby home

31 Things That Only Mothers Think About

  • Will I be able to take good care of my baby?
  • This is a lot of responsibility and it’s exhausting. I thought it would be more fun.
  • Will my breast milk be good enough to feed the baby properly?
  • Why do they seem to stop breathing when they are asleep? I think I better keep watch.
  • Are they complete on the inside? Do they have some kind of internal malformation that no one detected? I better call the pediatrician.
  • Will the baby be adequately hydrated just through breastfeeding? I better give the baby some water. No I probably shouldn’t.
  • Two days without defecating. Did I prepare the bottle properly? Did something go wrong?
  • Why is the baby crying so much? Am I interpreting the cries correctly?
  • I am exhausted and depressed. Does that make me a bad mother?
  • I have not been able to change my clothes. That seems unfair since I have changed the baby 5 times today.
  • This is not how I imagined it would be. I feel like crying.
  • Why hasn’t the baby’s first tooth emerged. Is something wrong?
  • Why doesn’t the baby sit on its own? What is happening?

When you start to work or leave them at daycare

  • I am free for hours! Why am I so happy?
  • I feel guilty for leaving my baby in someone else’s care. I could take care of the baby during the day and work during the night… that’s not crazy!
  • I feel like I’m avoiding my responsibilities, but I need to work. I have mixed feelings! Urgh! I feel like a bad mother.
  • Is the baby eating properly? Is it feeling bad?
  • What if they hit or hurt you? If I find out about something like that, they will see my bad side.
  • What will I do if the child continues using diapers until age 3?
  • Is the pediatrician’s office safe? Will the child get infected by the other children that are sick? They should split the office into two spaces: one with healthy children and the other one with sick children.
  • The grandparents are overfeeding the baby. I hope it doesn’t become overweight
  • When the baby’s grandparents take care of them, they return home “spoiled.” When they were raising me, my parents where stricter. The baby does whatever he wants with them, but I better keep quiet. I don’t want to make the situation more stressful.

And the list goes on…

When the child is older we will have a new set of “worries and thoughts.” When our child isn’t with us we worry: “What if they get kidnapped? Why hasn’t he called me? Could there have been an accident?”

Therefore, we can conclude that a mother’s love and worries never end.