How to Help Your Child Wake Up in a Good Mood?

· June 6, 2018

Some children have a hard time starting out the day. Getting them to wake up in the morning and follow a morning routine can be a chaotic challenge.

So, what can you do if your child’s not a morning person? To help your little one begin the day on the right foot, you need to rethink his or her morning routine. 

What’s more, you may need to adjust the amount of sleep your child is getting.

Do you find yourself wondering every day how to get your child to wake up in a good mood? Then it’s time to take a look at your routines.

It’s also good to make sure your child is getting enough sleep for his or her age. A child that doesn’t get enough sleep can suffer. And of course, when one child is tired, this affects the whole family. 

In the same way, you need to learn how to recognize the difficulties your child may be experiencing at bedtime. Solving these issues is beneficial for the entire family.

Keep in mind that the amount of sleep a child needs can vary from one kid to another.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends that school aged children (ages 6 to 12) sleep between 9 and 12 hours per day. At the same time, the Academy recommends that teens sleep between 8 and 10 hours a day. 

Not getting enough sleep can lead to irritability, difficulty concentrating, and headache. What’s more, it can even lead to hypertension, obesity and depression.

Suggestions for helping your child wake up in a good mood

Getting enough rest is key

How to Help Your Child Wake Up in a Good Mood?

Make an effort to put your child to bed at the same time every night. Of course, it’s normal for children to go to bed later than usual on weekends.

However, you shouldn’t allow it to get too late. Maintaining a consistent bedtime routine will help your little one get the rest he or she needs. And this, in turn, will help your child wake up happier and more refreshed.

Sweet tenderness

As mothers, we all know how to be gentle with our children. Surely you know how to wake your little one up in a sweet and tender way. Speak to him gently and give him a smile when he opens his eyes.

Don’t rush him, but rather give him time to get out of bed – 10 minutes or so to wake up. In the meantime, you can leave him alone with some music while you prepare breakfast, or stay with your child and help him sit up.

Start getting ready the night before

Lay your child’s outfit out for the next day, as well as your own. Doing this the night before will save you time in the morning. 

You can also prepare your child’s backpack and breakfast as much as possible.

All of this will allow you to keep a more relaxed pace in the morning without losing your patience.

“School aged children (ages 6 to 12) sleep between 9 and 12 hours per day… Teens sleep between 8 and 10 hours a day. Not getting enough sleep can lead to irritability, difficulty concentrating, and headache. What’s more, it can even lead to hypertension, obesity and depression.”

Keep healthy snacks on hand

As much as possible, try to keep healthy snacks on hand in your pantry and refrigerator. For example, you can store chopped or sliced fruit, bread for toasting, cheese, natural fruit juice, and cold water.

Having these items ready to go can come in handy for a quick breakfast in case you’re running late.

Don’t badger your child

If your child has a hard time getting out of bed in the morning, don’t rush or stress her with phrases like, “It’s late, hurry up…” 

Rather, try to wake your child in a calm way and help her carry out her morning routine peacefully and without stress.

Learn to identify if your child has sleep issues

How to Help Your Child Wake Up in a Good Mood?

According to the sleep institute’s article, there are signs that indicate that your child may have problems falling asleep. These include:

  • You spend a great deal of time trying to help your little one fall asleep.
  • Your child wakes up several times throughout the night.
  • Lack of sleep affects your child’s behavior and mood.
  • You and your partner cannot sleep because of your child’s sleeping difficulties.

The article also explains that the most common sleeping problems during infancy can be corrected once they’re identified and treated. 

It also states that common sense and the support of your pediatrician can generally help to resolve the issue. On some occasions, talking with other parents of children of the same age with the same issues can also be helpful.

Besides treating your child with gentleness and practicing a great deal of patience, your child also needs to rest. Your child’s crankiness may be the result of not getting enough sleep. 

Studies have shown that children who sleep enough function better. They’re also less prone to behavior problems and irritability.